Tag: ban

Am I Bridezilla if I ban this guy from my wedding?

Dear Amy: My fiance wants to invite “James,” his old college buddy, to our wedding.

Columnist Amy Dickinson (Bill Hogan/Chicago Tribune) 

James and I had a silly drunken fling prior to my relationship with my fiance. He knows about this and we have come to terms with it. Still, I regret my fling with James.

What’s more, I think he is a mean-spirited meddler. Years ago, he referred to me as “sloppy seconds” to my fiance.

Is it unreasonable for me to say that he can’t come to the wedding?

I don’t want to act like a Bridezilla.

Hopeful

Dear Hopeful: You and your fiance each have the right to invite people from your individual list to your wedding. As obnoxious as “James” might be, my own perspective is that you simply not liking someone on your fiance’s list does not justify eliminating him altogether. However, that “sloppy seconds” comment
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FEATURE -Job or hijab? Singapore debates ban on Islamic veil at work

Sept 21 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – Every day before she starts her shift at a government hospital in Singapore, Farah removes her hijab – the Islamic veil she has worn since a teenager.

Although minority Muslim women can freely wear the hijab in most settings in Singapore, some professions bar the headscarf – and a recent case has triggered fresh debate on diversity and discrimination in the workplace.

Now Farah has joined a growing number of Muslims – who account for about 15% of Singapore’s 4 million resident population – calling for the ban to end, with an online petition gathering more than 50,000 signatures.

“They told me I can’t work here if I wear the tudung,” said Farah, using the local Malay term for hijab, as she recounts her job interview two years ago for a physiotherapist position.

“I felt a sense

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Job or hijab? Singapore debates ban on veil at work



a group of people walking down the street: Job or hijab? Singapore debates ban on veil at work


© Provided by Khaleej Times
Job or hijab? Singapore debates ban on veil at work

Every day before she starts her shift at a government hospital in Singapore, Farah removes her hijab – the Islamic veil she has worn since a teenager.

Although minority Muslim women can freely wear the hijab in most settings in Singapore, some professions bar the headscarf – and a recent case has triggered fresh debate on diversity and discrimination in the workplace.

Now Farah has joined a growing number of Muslims – who account for about 15% of Singapore’s 4 million resident population – calling for the ban to end, with an online petition gathering more than 50,000 signatures.

“They told me I can’t work here if I wear the tudung,” said Farah, using the local Malay term for hijab, as she recounts her job interview two years

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‘If Sikhs can wear turban, why can’t Muslims wear hijab’; Singapore debates ban on Islamic veil at workplace : The Tribune India

September 21

Every day before she starts her shift at a government hospital in Singapore, Farah removes her hijab — the Islamic veil she has worn since a teenager.

Although minority Muslim women can freely wear the hijab in most settings in Singapore, some professions bar the headscarf – and a recent case has triggered fresh debate on diversity and discrimination in the workplace.

Now Farah has joined a growing number of Muslims – who account for about 15 per cent of Singapore’s four million resident population – calling for the ban to end, with an online petition gathering more than 50,000 signatures.

“They told me I can’t work here if I wear the tudung,” said Farah, using the local Malay term for hijab, as she recounts her job interview two years ago for a physiotherapist position.

“I felt a sense of helplessness, it’s unfair. Why has the tudung become

Read More
Read More

Job or hijab? Singapore debates ban on Islamic veil at work

(Thomson Reuters Foundation) – Every day before she starts her shift at a government hospital in Singapore, Farah removes her hijab – the Islamic veil she has worn since a teenager.

Although minority Muslim women can freely wear the hijab in most settings in Singapore, some professions bar the headscarf – and a recent case has triggered fresh debate on diversity and discrimination in the workplace.

Now Farah has joined a growing number of Muslims – who account for about 15% of Singapore’s 4 million resident population – calling for the ban to end, with an online petition gathering more than 50,000 signatures.

“They told me I can’t work here if I wear the tudung,” said Farah, using the local Malay term for hijab, as she recounts her job interview two years ago for a physiotherapist position.

“I felt a sense of helplessness, it’s unfair. Why has the tudung become

Read More
Read More